Tuesday, April 23, 2013

On the Rocks

Still pondering on the beauty of that week at the beach, I found some more photos that might bear doing a bit of work with. 
Our lot favours the coast north of Brisbane for many reasons, some sentimental and some aesthetic. 


One of the characteristics of the beaches there is the large expanses of coffee rock deposited by volcanic activity some gazillion years ago. It is marvelous stuff, providing rock pools, bridges, caves and waterfalls to intrigue and occupy children (and adults) for hours. That has probably gone on for a million years or so too.


One of the interesting properties of coffee rock is that, being quite porous, it breaks down easily and can be carved and eroded into myriad different forms.


It seems to have deposited a fine black sand that emerged as the top layers of white sand were washed away in the storms. I remember being on a Greek Island with sand like this. I don't remember which one but it was near a volcano. Anybody?


We discovered that by drawing in the top layers of white sand, the lower layers of black sand showed through like some kind of lovely, natural etching.


While the girls were drawing in the sand, it occurred to me that the sands and tide had produced some rather exquisite drawings without any human assistance whatsoever.

   

Some of these lines would make for delicious drawings on heavily textured paper


and would translate beautifully into black and white ink or charcoal drawings.


They had such a strength and fluidity from the rock and sand.


Only nature could dream up such inspired composition.


I think this is my favourite. It would make a rather striking large canvas.


Just saying.


18 comments:

  1. Nature is fantastic isn't it, spending time with your girls, sharing awe and wonder. You can't beat it can you! :) x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I should have done it sooner. It was very restorative. I am seeing things a little differently these days too.

      Delete
  2. Nature sure has created some beautiful things. x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have to look at the good ones don't you, Zara!

      Delete
  3. Just say away, and I totally agree ... got you paints out yet?

    Marvellous place ... if only your part of the world wasn't so darn hot!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tell me about it! We are just going into the pleasant time of year now with autumn, winter and spring. I should move to Wales for our summer and rug up- a much nicer prospect. We could knit in front of your fire instead of sweating in front oof my fridge!

      Delete
  4. Santorini has a volcano but I can't remember if the sand is black.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's the one! It seemed very strange to a couple of Queenslanders used to white sand. I vaguely remember sitting on a beach looking at another volcano but I think that was Southern Italy and Vesuvius. How addled must I be to get my volcanoes mixed up!?

      Delete
  5. Thank you for the spectacular takes on nature's beach sculpture.
    Beauty at its best.
    When I was a child travelling every Christmas to Coolangatta by steam train, life was richer in many ways.
    The beaches at Coolangatta were like that.
    I would spend hours finding little crabs in the rock pools and drawing in the dark clinging overlay of rutile.
    It as the fanatical rutile mining of the 60's and 70's that cost southern coast beaches this beauty and charm.
    So many shells were there too, of exotic variety.
    No one polluted . The beaches and bush places were pristine.
    I'm grateful to have lived with these experiences of joy and beauty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I didn't know it was called rutile. As always, you are a font, DMC.
      It seems each generation has a little less than the one before.
      (Unless you count technology- which I don't!)

      Delete
  6. They're beautiful Annie, and would look great on a canvas :-)

    ReplyDelete
  7. What a beautiful post...'on the rocks' yes sorry to be criptic but thers a lot of that going around. Hah! LGxx

    ReplyDelete
  8. The sand has created some stunning natural images, but I do agree they really lend themselves to working on. Love 'em.

    Lanzarote, one of the Canary Isles, is famous for its black volcanic sand but there's none of the white stuff left to create these lovely patterns.
    Axx

    ReplyDelete
  9. Are you 'just saying' that to me? I think I WOULD like to try and paint that!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wasn't but I can. I'll send you the photo and you can do one for you and one for me!

      Delete
  10. I like it this blog information, thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete

Comments are the best bit. Drop in if you have time. You are most welcome!

Popular Posts